My Apologies TDOT

I don’t mean to complain…
A while ago, I posted a complaint about TDOT’s inability to hang signs correctly.  While exiting from 129 N (Alcoa Highway) onto Kingston Pike, the warning sign for the red light is hung upside down.  As noted in that piece, not only is the sign upside down, a crew had to go back to this sign to affix a warning sign about the traffic cameras AND STILL DID NOT FIX THE OBVIOUSLY CARELESS JOB.
Alcoa Highway Map

This week while driving down Vanosdale/Buckingham to Kingston Pike, I saw the second sighting of TDOT’s carelessness.
Map of Vanosdale

Of course, I immediately had to pull the car to the side of the road and snap a quick shot of the sign because I could hardly believe it was happening to me.  I am probably the only person in the city/state/country that cares about such carelessness, but I could not help but find some delight in spotting the sign.  I pulled the car to the side, plopped on the emergency signals, and readied the Q for a blogtacular capture.
UPSIDE DOWN SIGN #2

After some thought about the matter, I realized that this is really not TDOT’s fault.  In fact, we should take some pity on the poor color blind worker that hung this sign.  In fact, we should also give any spare pity that we have to the supervisor that was working on the crew (for his/her colorblindedness) and every other state official or TDOT worker that has seen these two signs and not had the attention to detail basic cognizance to have the sign fixed.

I am sorry that it is so damn hard to hang signs correctly.


Jeremy Floyd

Jeremy Floyd is the Chief Marketing Officer at Back Porch Vista. Formerly, he was the president of Bluegill Creative, a marketing and communications firm in Knoxville, Tennessee. In addition to managing the digital strategies, Floyd is an adjunct professor for the University of Tennessee Chattanooga MBA program teaching digital strategies and social media. Floyd blogs at jeremyfloyd.com and tweets under the name @jfloyd. Jeremy is licensed to practice law in the State of Tennessee and holds a law degree from the University of Tennessee College of Law and a Bachelor of Arts degree from MTSU in English and Philosophy.